New book: Liberation Practices

This new book, edited by Taiwo Afuape and Gillian Hughes, both based in London, contains contributions from several members of this network.  While not specifically about Liberation Psychology, there are multiple references to the ideas of Ignacio Martín-Baró and to Liberation Psychology.  Click the image to go to the publisher’s page.  (If you’d like a pre-publication draft of the chapter by Carolyn Kagan and I, then send an email via this site’s contact page.)

image of book cover: Liberation Practices, Routledge, 2016

 

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About the Liberation Psychology Network

We’ve updated our “About” page which gives information about the network and its purpose.  It is worth posting it here too.  Why not download the pdf version, print it off and distribute it at your events, put it on the noticeboard, or discuss it with a colleague?

About Liberation Psychology and this network

You can download this as a pdf file for distribution at your event etc.

This international network helps users of English discover and share resources, experiences and new directions in Liberation Psychology.

 Background

Liberation psychology began in Latin America. It drew on currents of radical and critical praxis from that region and beyond and was first proposed by Ignacio Martín-Baró at the Universidad Centroamericana in El Salvador.

Some Liberation Psychology material has appeared in English, but most, including nearly all of Martí- Baró’s work, is only available in Spanish. It deserves being better known by those who do not read Spanish.

Liberation psychology is relevant to the work of psychologists and their allies concerned with oppression and exclusion, social trauma, social movements and resistance in the global South, and in core countries of the world system. Many people use English either as a first language or as their route of access to the international literature.

Latin American liberation psychology has focussed on the particular situation and identity of Latin America but exclusion and exploitation happens everywhere. If the Liberation Psychology of Martín-Baró and other Latin American comrades was the first Liberation Psychology, our world desperately needs a Second Liberation Psychology, not to replace their efforts but to take them further so we have a global Liberation Psychology for the extremely challenging situation that we find ourselves in more than 25 years after Martín Baró’s murder.

The Network:

  • Connects like minded workers, who are often isolated, to share their understandings and practical experience of liberatory approaches and to offer mutual support.

  • Provides access to the key ideas and works of Latin American liberation psychology and kindred approaches.  Our website links and hosts English language works (written as well as audio-visual)  Network members with knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese are key bridging resource.

  • Offers a bridge between workers in Latin America and other regions of the global South, and with those in core regions concerned with the “South” in our midst (exploitation, migration, war, (neo-)colonialism and exclusion of the Other).

  • Explores what Liberation Psychology means in contexts other than Latin America.

  • Hosts this web portal and blog which is enabled as a social network, and an email list.  See how to use the site.

The network is what its members make it. The possibilities are only limited by our imagination, energy and willingness to try new ways of doing Liberation Psychology: the constructively practical critical psychology.

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Liberation Psychology: another kind of critical psychology

Some of the contents

Some of the contents

Published this month is the Routledge Handbook of Critical Psychology at the silly price of £140 (or USDollars 225).  It is edited by Ian Parker.

It includes a chapter by me (Mark Burton – Manchester, UK) and Luis Gómez (Costa Rica): Liberation Psychology: Another Kind Of Critical Psychology.  In it we firmly locate liberation psychology within the long term de-colonial movement. Other chapters from colleagues involved in aspects of liberationist psychology include:
Indigenous Psychologies and Critical-Emancipatory Psychology Narcisa Paredes-Canilao, Ma. Ana Babaran-Diaz, Ma. Nancy B. Florendo and Tala Salinas-Ramos with S. Lily Mendoza
Postcolonial Theory: Towards A Worlding of Critical Psychology
Desmond Painter
From Critical Disability Studies To Critical Global Disability Studies Shaun Grech
Political Psychology and the American Continent: From Colonization and Domination to Liberation and Emancipation
Raquel S. L. Guzzo
and
Critical Psychology in the Arab World: Insights from Critical Community Psychology in the Palestinian Colonial Context
Ibrahim Makkawi

I haven’t read the chapters other than our own, and there is a lot of what I’d call academic critical psychology and a lot on discourse, deconstruction and psychoanalysis (for all of which I’ve little enthusiasm).  But it is something you might ask your library to order, and here’s a form to do so.

I’m also happy to supply a re-publication draft of our chapter if you write to me via the contact page.

 

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